DESIGN HISTORY

Impact crushers have been used by aggregate producers and mining companies for 40+ years and have been marketed as low wear-part cost and low downtime. This may be true in low abrasion materials. In highly abrasive materials, impact crushers have not lived up to the promise of low cost and downtime.

The designer of the Auto-Balance Impact Crusher discovered this the hard way - he leased a 75HP crusher to crush river rock with 50 to 60% abrasives.

30 days, 8000 tons and $8,000.00 worth of wear parts later, he decided “there has got to be a better way“.

Design of the Auto-Balance Impact Crusher began shortly thereafter.

THE GOAL: PROTECT AS MANY METAL PARTS AS POSSIBLE WITH MATERIAL PACKS

The biggest problem encountered was keeping the rotor in balance. (Most impacts use various types of metal partitions to force the material to flow through the rotor evenly and the wear parts cannot wear unevenly or the crusher vibrates severely.) After testing many different alternatives, the Auto-Balance feature was developed. Once this occurred, use of material packs inside the rotor became possible. This eliminated the metal partitions and minimized the number of areas on the rotor that wear. The auto-balance and other items are patented features of the Auto-Balance Impact Crusher. The use of material packs to protect metal parts has been extended to the sides, bottom and exit chutes. The top of the crusher does not experience wear because it is high enough to avoid the rock.